Religious Belief – Ateistet http://ateistet.org/ Tue, 14 Sep 2021 20:00:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://ateistet.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-150x150.png Religious Belief – Ateistet http://ateistet.org/ 32 32 Judge prevents New York from imposing vaccination warrant on medical workers https://ateistet.org/judge-prevents-new-york-from-imposing-vaccination-warrant-on-medical-workers/ https://ateistet.org/judge-prevents-new-york-from-imposing-vaccination-warrant-on-medical-workers/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 20:00:43 +0000 https://ateistet.org/judge-prevents-new-york-from-imposing-vaccination-warrant-on-medical-workers/ A federal judge on Tuesday temporarily barred New York state from requiring medical workers to get vaccinated after a group of healthcare workers sued, saying their constitutional rights were violated because the warrant state prohibited religious exemptions. Utica Judge David Hurd issued the order after 17 medical professionals, including doctors and nurses, claimed in a […]]]>

A federal judge on Tuesday temporarily barred New York state from requiring medical workers to get vaccinated after a group of healthcare workers sued, saying their constitutional rights were violated because the warrant state prohibited religious exemptions.

Utica Judge David Hurd issued the order after 17 medical professionals, including doctors and nurses, claimed in a lawsuit Monday that their rights had been violated with a vaccination warrant that banned exemptions.

The judge gave New York State until September 22 to respond to the trial in federal court in Utica. If the state objects to the plaintiffs’ request for a preliminary court order blocking the vaccine’s mandate, an oral hearing on September 28 will be held.

The state issued the order August 28, requiring at least a first injection for healthcare workers in hospitals and nursing homes by September 27. New York State Health Commissioner Dr Howard Zucker said in a statement last month that new vaccine requirements were needed to help curb the spread. of the Delta variant of the coronavirus and prevent other mutations.

No exemption for “sincere religious beliefs”

In their lawsuit, medical professionals disguised their identities under pseudonyms such as “Dr. A.”, “Nurse A.” and “Physician Liaison X”. They cited violations of the U.S. Constitution, as well as New York State Human Rights Act and New York City Human Rights Act, as the regulations of the state health ministry requiring workers to be vaccinated did not provide any exemptions for “sincere religious beliefs which compel the refusal of such vaccination.”

Court documents said all available vaccines use aborted fetal cell lines in their testing, development or production. The lawsuit said the plaintiffs wanted to proceed anonymously because they “run the risk of ostracism, threats of harm, immediate dismissal and other consequences of retaliation if their names are known.”


Vaccines mandate deepens political divide

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The plaintiffs, all Christians, included practicing doctors, nurses, a nuclear medicine technologist, a cognitive rehabilitation therapist and a liaison doctor who all religiously oppose any medical cooperation on abortion, according to the trial. He added that they are not “anti-vaccines” that oppose all vaccines.

Messages seeking comment were sent to the Thomas More Society attorneys who filed the complaint, the New York State Department of Health and the New York governor’s office. The state attorney general’s office referred the questions to the health department.

About 69% of New York City residents have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, according to Governor Kathy Hochul, citing data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Many large companies already require COVID-19 vaccination to protect employees from the virus, and must, under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, provide exemptions to people with disabilities or with a “genuine” religious belief that prevents them get the vaccine.

No major religious denomination in the United States categorically opposes vaccination. But an individual’s “sincere” religious belief does not necessarily have to be part of an organized religious mandate to be considered a valid reason for exemption from vaccination.

“It can be a personal and sincere religious belief that stems from the very nature of religious freedom set out in the First Amendment,” Domenique Camacho Moran, labor attorney at the firm of New York attorney Farrell Fritz. .

The Biden administration broad preventive measures on Thursday announced further expanding vaccination mandates, affecting an estimated 100 million Americans and shedding new light on requests for exemptions and how employers can verify their legitimacy.



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United Airlines employees with religious objections to Covid vaccine to be put on unpaid leave https://ateistet.org/united-airlines-employees-with-religious-objections-to-covid-vaccine-to-be-put-on-unpaid-leave/ https://ateistet.org/united-airlines-employees-with-religious-objections-to-covid-vaccine-to-be-put-on-unpaid-leave/#respond Fri, 10 Sep 2021 19:54:00 +0000 https://ateistet.org/united-airlines-employees-with-religious-objections-to-covid-vaccine-to-be-put-on-unpaid-leave/ By Chris Isidore, CNN Business (CNN) – United Airlines has told employees they will be put on indefinite unpaid leave if they refuse to be vaccinated against Covid for religious reasons. The company’s vaccine mandate is much stricter than those imposed by many other companies, or those announced by President Joe Biden on Thursday. The […]]]>

By Chris Isidore, CNN Business

(CNN) – United Airlines has told employees they will be put on indefinite unpaid leave if they refuse to be vaccinated against Covid for religious reasons.

The company’s vaccine mandate is much stricter than those imposed by many other companies, or those announced by President Joe Biden on Thursday. The federal mandate, and many already announced in other companies, gives employees the choice between getting vaccinated or having weekly Covid tests. At United, it’s basically about vaccination or dismissal.

While United is making accommodations for employees who have a valid medical or religious reason for not getting the vaccine, it revealed this week that there will be a fee for those who cite their religious belief as a reason for not getting the vaccine. .

“Given our focus on safety and the sharp increase in Covid infections, hospitalizations and deaths, all employees approved for application will be placed on temporary personal leave without pay on October 2 while measures to Specific safety for unvaccinated employees is instituted, ”United’s memo said. to employees. “Given the dire statistics… we can no longer allow unvaccinated people to return to the workplace until we have a better understanding of how they might interact with our clients and their vaccinated colleagues.”

United said a decision on whether or not to accept an employee’s religious objections to the vaccination would be made on a case-by-case basis.

“We work hard to ensure the safety of our employees and customers while accommodating employees who sincerely hold religious beliefs,” the airline statement read.

United has 67,000 active employees in the United States covered by the mandate. Almost all non-managerial employees are represented by a union.

United’s major unions did not oppose the airline’s initial statement on a vaccine mandate in August. It was not clear whether most unions are prepared to challenge the airline’s position on unpaid leave for their members with religious objections to the vaccine. Some did not respond to requests for comment on Friday.

“We are reviewing our legal and contractual options to support these pilots,” the Air Line Pilots Association said in response to a question.

However, the Teamsters union, which represents more than 6,000 of the airline’s mechanics, has simply said it “does not accept United Airlines’ position on this issue.”

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in the United States has advised employers that they can impose vaccines on their employees. But the agency also said allegations of religious objections generally should not be disputed by an employer and should be “generally presumed or easily established.”

Yet, no major religious denomination opposes the vaccination, despite some clergymen who have raised objections.

Even the Church of Christian Science, which teaches its members to use prayer rather than medicine to maintain their health in most cases, has not prohibited the use of the vaccine by its adherents. His statement calls on members to have “respect for public health authorities and conscientious obedience to the laws of the country, including those requiring vaccination.”

United employees on unpaid leave do not receive other benefits, such as medical insurance, although they can maintain their coverage by paying the full premium themselves under Cobra. They retain their seniority in the company during unpaid leave. And seniority is a major factor in determining the working conditions, pay and hours of employees in the airline industry.

United employees who have a medical reason not to get the vaccine will be put on paid leave, United spokeswoman Leslie Scott said.

– CNN’s Kwegyirba Croffie contributed to this report


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Donald Trump says he is “surprised” not to have obtained more Catholic votes in 2020 https://ateistet.org/donald-trump-says-he-is-surprised-not-to-have-obtained-more-catholic-votes-in-2020/ https://ateistet.org/donald-trump-says-he-is-surprised-not-to-have-obtained-more-catholic-votes-in-2020/#respond Tue, 07 Sep 2021 19:44:54 +0000 https://ateistet.org/donald-trump-says-he-is-surprised-not-to-have-obtained-more-catholic-votes-in-2020/ WASHINGTON (RNS) – In another sign that Donald Trump is considering a race to return to the White House, the former president and his religious advisers announced the launch of a National Faith Advisory Council on Thursday, September 2, apparently aimed at reinvigorating its conservative Christian base. The new initiative, first reported by Jewish media […]]]>

WASHINGTON (RNS) – In another sign that Donald Trump is considering a race to return to the White House, the former president and his religious advisers announced the launch of a National Faith Advisory Council on Thursday, September 2, apparently aimed at reinvigorating its conservative Christian base.

The new initiative, first reported by Jewish media outlet The Forward, was officially unveiled in a conference call hosted by Intercessors for America and led by longtime Trump adviser Paula White. The pastor of the Pentecostal mega-church said the new effort, which includes the participation of “70 cadres,” is intended to continue the “great work that we have done,” referring to the efforts she oversaw as as head of Trump’s White House denominational office.

In another sign that Donald Trump is considering a race to return to the White House, the former president and his religious advisers announced the launch of a National Faith Advisory Council.

White drew parallels with the establishment of a previous “faith advisory committee,” a likely reference to a group of largely evangelical Christian leaders who advised Trump’s presidential campaign in 2016 and functioned as an informal council on religious issues throughout his presidency.

“It has become the strongest coalition in modern history,” White said of the work of the board. “Our unity has brought unprecedented victories, influence and access. “

White was joined by Jennifer Korn, who was previously Special Assistant to then-President Trump through her White House Public Liaison Office. Korn told listeners that the new National Faith Advisory Board “will continue the work of the White House Public Liaison Office outside to ensure that we are one strong voice.”

Trump echoed most of the rest of the call with lengthy remarks in which he wavered between criticizing President Joe Biden’s record on denominational issues – “a lot has happened in regards to faith and religion , and these are not good things “—and praising his own mandate, saying:” One of my greatest honors has been to fight for religious freedom and to defend the Judeo-Christian values ​​and principles of the foundation of our nation. “

Trump echoed most of the rest of the call with lengthy remarks in which he oscillated between criticizing President Joe Biden’s record on religious issues and praising his own mandate.

He listed various accomplishments of the Trump administration popular with conservative Christians, such as the designation of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, the founding of a new religious office in the White House, the declaration of “essential” churches during the coronavirus pandemic and the appointment of conservative justices to the federal bench and the Supreme Court.

Trump hinted at last week’s Supreme Court decision not to block a controversial Texas abortion ban, saying, “Even last night you get some very powerful rulings, more powerful than anyone else. ‘would have thought. “

He also reiterated the claim he had “totally wiped out” the Johnson Amendment, a section of the US tax code that prohibits religious groups and other nonprofits from supporting candidates. (Trump’s 2017 executive order was intended to hamper its enforcement but did not remove the law.)

Trump then answered questions from leaders of various faith-based organizations, most of which are policy-oriented, including Jason Yates, CEO of My Faith Votes; Brian Burch, director of CatholicVote.org; Dave Kubal, head of Intercessors for America; Rabbi Yaakov Menken, Director General of the Coalition for Jewish Values; and Dave Donaldson, co-founder of CityServe.

Responding to their questions, Trump criticized Biden’s withdrawal from Afghanistan, calling it a “mad rush” and lamenting the Taliban’s seizure of US military equipment.

Discussing the Catholic vote, he admitted that he had lost ground with the bloc during his four years in power.

Trump referred to hypothetical future scenarios “if we are able to come back”, while repeating the widely discredited claim that the 2020 election was “stolen” from him. Discussing the Catholic vote, he admitted that he had lost ground with the bloc during his four years in power.

“I’m a little surprised that we didn’t do better with the Catholic vote,” Trump said. “I think now they would give us a vote. I think we got about 50 percent of the vote. And yet, we have done a lot for the Catholic vote. So we’ll have to talk to them. We’re going to have to meet the Catholics.

According to a recent election analysis published by Pew Research, Trump won the support of 50% of Catholics overall in 2020, a drop of 2 percentage points from 2016 (Biden took 49%, compared to 44% for the Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton in 2016).

The change was most dramatic among White Catholics, a key constituency on the battlefield, according to Rust Belt: Trump’s share in that vote rose from 64% to 57% between 2016 and 2020, while Biden gained 42% , an improvement of 11 percentage points over Clinton. in 2016.

The former president expressed frustration at the lack of support from Jewish voters, despite his administration’s support for Israel.

The former president expressed frustration at the lack of support from Jewish voters, despite his administration’s support for Israel. “Look at what I did with the embassy in Jerusalem and what I did with so many other things. … Israel has never had a best friend, and yet I got 25% of the vote, ”Trump said. “I think they have to get together. There needs to be a little more unity with the religious groups all represented on this call.

Polls of Jewish voters in the 2020 election have varied, with a Republican Jewish Coalition poll finding 30 percent support for Trump and a separate poll by the liberal J Street group reporting only 21 percent .

Trump made similar remarks when answering a question from Yates of My Faith Votes.

“All I can tell you is I think we have to have a great election and we have to have a strong vote,” Trump said. “If we don’t have a very strong vote, then Jason, I’ll talk to you in the future, but it won’t be very positive.”

Trump, a former Presbyterian who converted to non-denominational Christianity towards the end of his term, was also asked directly about his belief in God.

“Everything is based on God, it’s so important,” Mr. Trump said of his religious beliefs. “God is so important to the success of what we do. Because without God we have nothing.

“Everything is based on God, it’s so important,” he replied. “God is so important to the success of what we do. Because without God we have nothing.

The call ended with a prayer from Robert Morris, pastor of Gateway Church near Dallas, which Trump visited during his 2020 campaign. Morris was among the religious leaders who gathered in the White House rose garden to celebrating Amy Coney Barrett’s appointment to the Supreme Court in September of that year, a no-mask case later called a COVID-19 spreading event.

Morris prayed for Trump and his family, saying they “have suffered more attack from the enemy than any president we can remember.” He added, “And yet, Lord, he continues to stand strong for the Jewish people, and for Christians, and Lord, for the Judeo-Christian foundation of our nation. “

Morris then concluded by echoing Trump’s criticisms of Biden and reiterating the debunked suggestion that the election was “stolen.”

“I pray for Americans who voted the wrong way,” he said. “I pray, God, that they will see what … bad administration, what it does to a great nation.” I pray, Lord, that You will do something even, too, Lord, for our electoral system. That we’ll never have another election stolen from the American people, the American people. We should be concerned about it. So Lord, whatever we have to do to fix the electoral process, I pray for it. “

At the end of the session, White told listeners that there would be monthly calls and to keep an eye on “instructions.”

“Thank you for this coalition of unity which has always had such influence and such power to make things happen,” she said. “We are in a great battle, but I feel we have the capacity to achieve great victories.”


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Left-wing activists use old tactics in new assault on liberalism https://ateistet.org/left-wing-activists-use-old-tactics-in-new-assault-on-liberalism/ https://ateistet.org/left-wing-activists-use-old-tactics-in-new-assault-on-liberalism/#respond Fri, 03 Sep 2021 17:23:20 +0000 https://ateistet.org/left-wing-activists-use-old-tactics-in-new-assault-on-liberalism/ Sep 4, 2021 THEIBERALISM WAS forged in revolt against the denominational state that had ruled Europe for over a millennium. In medieval Europe, the Roman Catholic Church employed a transnational army of clerics in black coats who demanded obedience on all spiritual and moral matters and had a monopoly on education. The Reformation introduced religious […]]]>

THEIBERALISM WAS forged in revolt against the denominational state that had ruled Europe for over a millennium. In medieval Europe, the Roman Catholic Church employed a transnational army of clerics in black coats who demanded obedience on all spiritual and moral matters and had a monopoly on education. The Reformation introduced religious competition, strengthening the denominational state. Jean Calvin crushed dissent in Geneva through imprisonment, exile and execution. Henry VIII began to boil the dissidents alive. The Roman Church invented the Inquisition and the Index of Forbidden Books.

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Liberalism began to tear apart this fusion of church and state 350 years ago. John Milton wrote that if the waters of truth “do not flow in perpetual progression, they fall into a muddy pool of conformity and tradition.” Baruch Spinoza insisted that Scripture should be interpreted like any other book. David Hume and John Stuart Mill argued that the best way to establish the truth is through vigorous debate.

The fruit of this reflection has been gathered in three revolutions. In the United States, Thomas Jefferson has called “the loathsome combination of church and state” the root of most of the world’s ills. The French also established a secular republic. The gradual English revolution left the Church of England untouched but marginalized.

Yet something extraordinary is happening in the West: a new generation of progressives is reviving methods that strangely resemble those of the denominational state, with modern versions of loyalty oaths and blasphemy laws. And this effort is carried out at the heart of Anglo-Saxon liberalism, often by people who call themselves liberals. Here’s how old tactics are revived.

Impose orthodoxy. Orthodoxy today is supported by an intellectual elite rather than a spiritual one. Their natural home is the university. Some 70 to 80% of right-wing academics and doctoral students in Britain and America say their departments are hostile environments, according to Eric Kaufmann of Birkbeck College London.

The progressive left is even more dominant among students. There is nothing new about the leftist student revolts, but the protests of the 1960s were against the remnants of the denominational state: Radicals in Berkeley, California turned Sproul Plaza into a free speech zone, where everything could be said, and People’s Park in a zone of freedom for all, where everything could be done. Radicals today demand the application of codes of conduct and speech. A survey of over 4,000 four-year-old students for the Knight Foundation in 2019 found that 68% felt students couldn’t say what they thought because their classmates might find it offensive.

Proselytizing. Religious denominations have always had a vanguard, like the Jesuit order, which sees it as their job to shift the boundaries of belief and behavior towards righteousness. The vanguard of the awakened revolution is made up of young militants. Belief in the foundations of liberalism such as free speech declines with each generation. The Pew Research Center notes that 40% of millennials are in favor of removing, in various unspecified ways, speech deemed offensive to minorities, compared to 27% of Gen Xers, 24% of baby boomers and only 12% of the oldest cohorts.

Progressives are replacing the liberal emphasis on tolerance and choice with an emphasis on coercion and power. As in many religions, the righteous have a duty to challenge immorality wherever they find it. They find many, believing that whites can be guilty of racism even if they do not consciously discriminate against others on the basis of race, as they are the beneficiaries of an exploitative system. Classic liberals have conceded that your freedom to swing your fist ends where my nose begins. Progressives today maintain that your freedom to express your opinions ends where my feelings begin.

Expel heretics. The new denominational state enforces ideological conformity by expelling heretics from their jobs, a practice the Liberals have shed a lot of blood in trying to eradicate. In academia, this is becoming familiar.

In 2018, Colin Wright, a post-doctoral student at Penn State University, wrote two articles claiming that sex is a biological reality and not a social construct, a statement that would once have been uncontroversial. Critics have issued a warning that “Colin Wright is a transphobe who supports Race Science” and sent emails to research committees condemning him. Sympathetic academics told him privately that they couldn’t offer him a job because it was “too risky”.

Book ban. In Restoration England, the University of Oxford burned the works of Hobbes and Milton in the big quad next to the Bodleian Library. Today, academics put trigger warnings on books, alerting students to the dangers of reading them. Young publishers are trying to get controversial books “canceled”.

Although they have failed their most high-profile targets such as JK Rowling (editors need to make money), they succeed with fewer fries, creating an atmosphere in which editors are less likely to bet on unknown authors with controversial opinions. Alexandra Duncan, a white American, even canceled her own book, “Ember Days”, after writing from a black woman’s perspective, which is now dismissed as “cultural appropriation.”

Creed. Churches have demanded that people sign a declaration of religious beliefs, such as the 39 Articles of the Anglican Church, before they can hold civil office. The University of California (UC) does something similar. Applicants for faculty positions must complete statements on how they will advance diversity and inclusion.

These are laudable goals. But Abigail Thompson, until recently president of mathematics at UC Davis and a longtime liberal, points out that UCThe scoring system rewards a waking vision of how to achieve them. In 2019, the life sciences department of UC Berkeley rejected 76% of applicants based on their diversity claims without looking at their research records.

Blasphemy. Scotland, the birthplace of the Enlightenment, abolished the crime of blasphemy in March. At the same time, however, he reintroduced it by creating new offenses such as “incitement to hatred” and “abusive speech” – punishable by up to seven years in prison.

The analogy with the past has its limits: no one is burned at the stake. But it is a useful reminder that liberal values ​​such as tolerance cannot be taken for granted. They were the product of centuries of argument and effort. The liberal state is still much younger today than the denominational state was when liberalism replaced it.

This article appeared in the Briefing section of the print edition under the title “Echos of the confessional state”


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“Beliefs” added as immunization exemption at Allan Hancock College https://ateistet.org/beliefs-added-as-immunization-exemption-at-allan-hancock-college/ https://ateistet.org/beliefs-added-as-immunization-exemption-at-allan-hancock-college/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 12:56:00 +0000 https://ateistet.org/beliefs-added-as-immunization-exemption-at-allan-hancock-college/ The Allan Hancock College board voted to include sincere beliefs and antibodies from past exemptions from COVID-19 infection to its COVID-19 vaccine tenure at a special meeting on Tuesday evening. In addition, they decided that unvaccinated people will have to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test every three days. Administrators have ordered rapid test […]]]>

The Allan Hancock College board voted to include sincere beliefs and antibodies from past exemptions from COVID-19 infection to its COVID-19 vaccine tenure at a special meeting on Tuesday evening.

In addition, they decided that unvaccinated people will have to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test every three days. Administrators have ordered rapid test kits for the campus.

Trustees Hilda Zacarias and Alejandra Enciso Medina opposed including sincere beliefs as an exemption.

Ms Zacarias sees the issue as an emotional issue, she said, as an immunocompromised student and caregiver of two loved ones in hospice care.

“I don’t have immunity, and even the vaccine needs to be given to me more regularly because it doesn’t work in my body system,” she said. “Does this mean that now I am not a candidate for further training, that I must abandon my goal of being able to obtain the diploma I have been looking for a year? “

Mr Medina thought the exemption was not strict enough, but she also struggled to draw the line of what is a valid belief.

“I have a feeling that we will open the doors to everyone,” she said. “And like we’ve all said, none of us want to take the burden of deciding what our religious or personal beliefs are. And so it’s really hard for me to understand, especially because I know my freedom is coming to an end. when it affects the health or, personally, the safety of someone else.

The board chose the language of “sincerely held belief” without further specifying religious beliefs, as these are included in sincere beliefs.

Superintendent / Chairman Kevin G. Walthers noted that there were “a lot of mixed opinions” from students, faculty and other stakeholders.

“We don’t want to be the arbiter of sincere religious beliefs. We think it’s a slippery slope, ”he said.

Public comments were mixed but respectful.

One student was frustrated at not understanding the lingo often used in the COVID-19 protocol, such as “asymptomatic.”

He said other students believe in misinformation, such as the theories that the vaccine would prevent them from going to heaven. He was sympathetic and wanted the college to reach out with more education for the students.

Dr Alina Romo, assistant professor of English at Hancock, has taken a more aggressive stance on disinformation.

“When we, as professors, as an institution of higher education, allow individuals to assert that things make sense and that facts are only facts, when it suits them, we run the risk. to dismantle the fundamental role of education, ”she said.

Men’s basketball coach Tyson Aye spoke on behalf of the athletics department and called for regular testing as an acceptable exemption.

“We have a number of students from out of the region who have invested almost everything financially and personally to be in our college. And to take that away from them after the fact, we don’t think it’s the right thing to do, ”he said.

Other professors also noted that students registered before the term.

Hancock Fire Academy coordinator Leonard Champion said he didn’t think the tests were reasonable.

“I ask you to implement daily screening of all students and faculty, instead of invasive testing for a single group. Those (vaccinated) can still transmit the virus, so treat both and test for both as such, ”he said.

Students and staff have until October 1 to get vaccinated.

The college encourages vaccination with $ 250 Visa gift cards. Over 4,100 credited and uncredited students have claimed their cards.

email: ahanshaw@newspress.com


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MSU reaches deadline for students and staff to get vaccinated https://ateistet.org/msu-reaches-deadline-for-students-and-staff-to-get-vaccinated/ https://ateistet.org/msu-reaches-deadline-for-students-and-staff-to-get-vaccinated/#respond Tue, 31 Aug 2021 22:13:00 +0000 https://ateistet.org/msu-reaches-deadline-for-students-and-staff-to-get-vaccinated/ EAST LANSING, Michigan – Effective today, all students, staff, and faculty at Michigan State University must be vaccinated against COVID-19. Julian Stainback is not. He is starting his final year at MSU. “It’s last year and it’s bittersweet because I can finally be back on campus,” Stainback said. He’s excited for a more normal year […]]]>

EAST LANSING, Michigan – Effective today, all students, staff, and faculty at Michigan State University must be vaccinated against COVID-19.

Julian Stainback is not.

He is starting his final year at MSU.

“It’s last year and it’s bittersweet because I can finally be back on campus,” Stainback said.

He’s excited for a more normal year with in-person classes even if that means students need to get the COVID-19 shot.

“The process they sent out last week, indicating whether you can qualify for a medical, religious, or online-only exemption if you only take online classes,” Stainback said.

He asked for a religious exemption.

“I wrote a statement about my religious beliefs and how I feel religiously, why this exempts me from the vaccine and they said they would get back with me hopefully by the first day of school, but I haven’t received anything yet, ”Stainback said.

Pending approval, Stainback has said he will need to participate in the Spartan Spit program. If approved, he will still have to participate.

“I know that if I’m approved for a bye, I have to compete in Spartan Spit, just like a few other people I know who got exemptions,” Stainback said.

We have contacted MSU to discuss the deadline for the vaccination mandate, but have not received a response.

This mandate drew opposition.

Jeanna Norris, administrative associate and financial officer of the university, sues President Samuel Stanley and the Board of Trustees.

Norris claims she has natural immunity after recovering from the virus late last year. She said her immunologist told her that it was medically unnecessary to get the vaccine.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says scientists don’t know how long COVID will protect you from having it again.

Norris said the university threatened disciplinary action or dismissal if she and other employees did not comply with the school’s mandatory vaccination policy.

Norris is represented by the New Civil Liberties Alliance. They said two antibody tests show Norris’ strong immunity to reinfection and that she does not pose a threat to the MSU community.

The university will conduct random checks on the immunization status of students throughout the year and will follow up on all advice submitted to the MSU Misconduct hotline.

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Bishop of Tucson: No religious exemptions for vaccines, mask warrants | Local News https://ateistet.org/bishop-of-tucson-no-religious-exemptions-for-vaccines-mask-warrants-local-news/ https://ateistet.org/bishop-of-tucson-no-religious-exemptions-for-vaccines-mask-warrants-local-news/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 20:50:00 +0000 https://ateistet.org/bishop-of-tucson-no-religious-exemptions-for-vaccines-mask-warrants-local-news/ The Bishop of Tucson, Edward Weisenburger, has ordered his clergy not to grant religious exemptions to community members who request them for COVID-19 vaccination warrants or mask requirements. On Tuesday, the head of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Tucson sent a letter to priests explaining his views on the issue after he was approached about […]]]>

The Bishop of Tucson, Edward Weisenburger, has ordered his clergy not to grant religious exemptions to community members who request them for COVID-19 vaccination warrants or mask requirements.

On Tuesday, the head of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Tucson sent a letter to priests explaining his views on the issue after he was approached about exemptions from the vaccine and mask mandates.

In the letter, Weisenburger notes that while vaccinations are a matter of individual decision, the moral good of the community takes precedence over personal preferences.

“I don’t see how a Catholic could ask for an exemption from a vaccine or mask warrant based on their Catholic faith,” Weisenburger wrote. “Likewise, I don’t see how a Catholic minister could approve such an exemption based on our Catholic faith. Although an individual may have a certain reserve based on his conscience, such a reserve is not related to our Catholic faith. “

The Vatican’s office of orthodoxy, the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, released its position on COVID-19 vaccinations in December, saying vaccines can be received without moral compromise.

Weisenburger’s statement comes after Tucson City Council made COVID-19 vaccinations mandatory for all 4,300-plus employees in the city. To qualify for an exemption due to a disability or sincere religious belief, employees had to submit an accommodation request to the city’s human resources department.


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Religious leaders vote on mask, vaccine debate https://ateistet.org/religious-leaders-vote-on-mask-vaccine-debate/ https://ateistet.org/religious-leaders-vote-on-mask-vaccine-debate/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 21:28:00 +0000 https://ateistet.org/religious-leaders-vote-on-mask-vaccine-debate/ WINK Masks and vaccines have created a wedge during the pandemic. Some people cite their belief system as the reason they avoid both. WINK News is pushing religious leaders here and while they are not of the same faith, they all agree that we should help each other protect each other. Online, the idea of […]]]>

WINK

Masks and vaccines have created a wedge during the pandemic. Some people cite their belief system as the reason they avoid both. WINK News is pushing religious leaders here and while they are not of the same faith, they all agree that we should help each other protect each other.

Online, the idea of ​​whether Jesus would have worn a mask or not is being launched. Reverend Dr Rickey Anderson Sr. is the founding pastor of Followers of Christ Fellowship Ministries. William Glover is the senior pastor of Mount Hermon Church. Nicole Luna is a Rabi from Temple Beth El.

“When Jesus was alive, he believed in the safety of human beings and wanted everyone to be healed. And so if wearing a mask would bring healing to people, it sure would, ”Reverend Anderson said.

“Jesus would absolutely follow the medical wisdom of the day,” said Pastor Glover.

“In Judaism we have a God of love, a God of concern. And God who is with us. And I certainly believe that for love, it is an expression of divine love in us when we wear a mask, ”said Rabi Luna.

So what would Jesus think of vaccines?

“We would call it a mitzvah [a] sacred responsibility to take care of one another to love our neighbor to love the stranger, ”said Rabi Luna.

“There is age-old wisdom on how to protect yourself against an airborne virus. And some of that wisdom says the most basic thing you can do is wear a mask or a face covering, ”Pastor Glover said.

Pope Francis says vaccination is a simple but profound way to promote the common good and care for one another. Different faith leaders have a similar message.

“Jesus recognized physicians in his day, he recognized that physicians had the power to heal with medicine,” said Pastor Glover.

“We can all play a part. And then we realize that it is possible to just put on a mask, and, you know, God willing, that will help us to get out of it as soon as possible,” Rabi Luna said.

Over the past month, Mount Hermon Church has held COVID-19 vaccination clinics for the community. Pastor Glover has also said this since the approval of the Pfizer vaccine by the FDA. his church plans to host another.


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As health system stretches hand over mandatory vaccinations, staff members push back | Best Stories https://ateistet.org/as-health-system-stretches-hand-over-mandatory-vaccinations-staff-members-push-back-best-stories/ https://ateistet.org/as-health-system-stretches-hand-over-mandatory-vaccinations-staff-members-push-back-best-stories/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 03:11:29 +0000 https://ateistet.org/as-health-system-stretches-hand-over-mandatory-vaccinations-staff-members-push-back-best-stories/ LOWVILLE – When the state indicated last week that COVID-19 vaccinations would be mandatory for employees of hospitals and nursing homes, the leadership of the Lewis County Health System decided to share the information with employees as soon as possible. Some of these employees are already pushing back. On Friday afternoon, Managing Director Gerald R. […]]]>

LOWVILLE – When the state indicated last week that COVID-19 vaccinations would be mandatory for employees of hospitals and nursing homes, the leadership of the Lewis County Health System decided to share the information with employees as soon as possible. Some of these employees are already pushing back.

On Friday afternoon, Managing Director Gerald R. Cayer sent the Department of Health vaccine mandate order to the management team and an email about the order and its details to the rest of the staff, inviting all staff to go through the human resources department. to view the entire order.

“We got this order and I basically helped communicate it to the workforce, making them aware of it, because you can’t force something like a vaccination without (letting people) digest the information. “Mr. Cayer said in an interview on Monday. . “In communication, I shared the order and talked about medical and religious exemptions.”

The vaccination warrant, signed by Health Commissioner Dr. Howard A. Zucker, requires vaccination against COVID-19 for anyone “employed or affiliated … salaried or not … salaried, member of the medical staff and nurse, contract staff, students and volunteers ”in hospitals or nursing homes that could transmit COVID-19, if they are carriers of the virus, to patients, other staff and residents through activities that their role requires them to do.

On Monday, an expanded ordinance added employees in diagnostic and treatment centers, adult care facilities, home care agencies and hospice programs to the list of healthcare workers who need to be vaccinated against the disease. COVID-19, but members of that group have until October. 7 to secure their first shots.

Staff in hospitals and nursing homes are due for their first injections by September 27.

People who do not comply, according to the mandate, will lose their jobs. The reason for making vaccinations mandatory is to stop the spread of COVID-19 to patients and residents who visit care and support facilities, especially with the delta variant, which is “twice as transmissible”, according to the document.

Already, there has been resistance from hospital staff.

Some raged on social media while others approached local TV media to denounce the state by telling them what to put in their bodies. A person who worked in clinical services at the Lewis County facility resigned directly due to the tenure on Monday.

According to Mr Cayer, although he tried to open a discussion with the email he sent to staff, no one has contacted internally to discuss the options and voice concerns.

“What I hear from individuals through individuals is that it’s a matter of principle. Throughout the pandemic, we worked not to judge whether people were vaccinated or not, but rather to encourage them, make them available (and) provide education. With all of this, we were able to achieve a 66 percent vaccination rate, ”Cayer said. “We did not reach the 80% threshold, but with positive engagement, I am proud that we have reached 66%. “

The state has allowed immunization exemptions in order for two reasons: medical and religious.

For a medical exemption to be acceptable, the state of health must be certified by a physician or nurse practitioner as being that which, in combination with the vaccine, is likely to adversely affect the health of the person.

The religious exemption must be granted to anyone who “has a genuine and sincere religious belief contrary to the practice of vaccination”.

“The Department of Health does not provide the criteria (for exemptions). They expect each individual health system to provide the criteria, ”Cayer said.

While the development of guidelines for medical exemptions will be science-based, finding a way to codify what is a “genuine and sincere” religious belief is much more difficult.

Mr Cayer and his team worked today on what he believes to be the latest draft of these criteria with the hope of having it completed by Friday so that the forms can be filled out by those seeking exemptions. .

People released from the vaccination requirement will be tested weekly for the virus and will wear masks at all times, Cayer said. The type of work and engagement with patients and residents for each person will decide what type of mask will be worn.

“When you mandate adults to do something, it just creates a challenge of personal philosophy just by mandating, so now we have to do it while respecting different points of view,” Cayer said. “Hopefully, the lion’s share of those who are not vaccinated will choose to be vaccinated. We will do all we can to support this.

Concerns about the potential for the loss of what could be a catastrophic number of staff, in an environment where the workforce is already strained, led the health system team to begin to develop contingency plans in the event. where the worst-case scenario would occur.

“One of the things we do as part of our planning is reach out to each individual so that we can assess what they are thinking and feeling at this point so that we don’t wait until the last minute to determine. if anyone is going to be vaccinated, ”said the CEO.

The health system is also in the process of clarifying which departments might be hardest hit by the mandate because they have the most unvaccinated staff, calculating what reallocations might be possible to support those departments.

Ultimately, the healthcare system will contact the Department of Health’s Surge and Flex operations center for the first time since the start of the pandemic for staffing issues.

Mr Cayer has registered to participate in the public hearing on the vaccination warrant order which will take place on September 2.

“If my entry is chosen, it will give me the opportunity to reflect the challenges that this would pose,” Cayer said. “It’s really about continuing to staff our service lines, which concerns me a lot.”

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Old Globe will require proof of COVID-19 vaccination starting Tuesday https://ateistet.org/old-globe-will-require-proof-of-covid-19-vaccination-starting-tuesday/ https://ateistet.org/old-globe-will-require-proof-of-covid-19-vaccination-starting-tuesday/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 22:47:21 +0000 https://ateistet.org/old-globe-will-require-proof-of-covid-19-vaccination-starting-tuesday/ SAN DIEGO (CNS) – Starting Tuesday, people attending an event or show at the Old Globe will be required to show proof of full COVID-19 vaccination. “The health and safety of the public, artists, staff and the entire community is the top priority for The Old Globe, especially as the circumstances surrounding COVID-19 continue to […]]]>

SAN DIEGO (CNS) – Starting Tuesday, people attending an event or show at the Old Globe will be required to show proof of full COVID-19 vaccination.

“The health and safety of the public, artists, staff and the entire community is the top priority for The Old Globe, especially as the circumstances surrounding COVID-19 continue to evolve,” said Globe officials. “Through close consultation with medical and public health officials, we are announcing a new set of policies for attending a play or event at the Old Globe. “

“Fully vaccinated” is defined by the United States Centers for Disease Control as at least 14 days after receiving the second dose of a two-dose vaccine – either the Pfizer-BioNtech or Moderna vaccine – or a dose of single injection vaccine Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

To be admitted to Globe theaters, participants must present photo ID and proof of their vaccination status. Acceptable proof of vaccination is the COVID-19 vaccination record issued at the time of inoculation, a photograph of the client’s vaccination record or a digital vaccination record.

California residents can request a digital vaccination record from https://myvaccinerecord.cdph.ca.gov/.

Customers who do not receive COVID-19 vaccines for medical reasons or religious beliefs may attend a production at The Old Globe, but must submit negative results from a COVID-19 PCR test taken within 72 hours of their receipt. entry into the establishment.

Customers under the age of 12, whose age does not yet allow vaccination, may attend a production but will be required to wear a mask or present negative results of a COVID-19 PCR test.

Documents will be checked by Globe staff members before clients are admitted. Staff will deny admission to anyone who does not provide the necessary documentation or who does not follow any policies related to COVID.

“When the Old Globe indoor theaters reopen in September, customers attending performances at these theaters – the Old Globe Theater and the Sheryl and Harvey White theaters – are required to wear masks throughout the performance as an added safety measure. “, said officials.

It is recommended, but not required, that patrons wear masks when attending the production of “Hair” at the Globe’s Lowell Davies Festival Open-Air Theater and all scheduled events at Globe’s Copley Plaza.

“Hair,” the rock musical, continues airing at 8 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday and ends August 31.

“Les jardins d’Anuncia”, a world premiere musical comedy commissioned by The Globe, begins September 10 and runs through October 17.

Copyright 2021, City News Service, Inc.


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